Arti Rai

Arti Rai
Arti Rai’s teaching and research interests are intellectual property (with a focus on patent law), law and the biopharmaceutical industry, health care regulation, and torts. Her most recent publications include “Engaging Facts and Policy: A Multi-Institutional Approach to Patent System Reform,” 106 Columbia Law Review (2003); “Gene Patenting: A Case Study in Patenting Research Tools,” 77(2) Academic Medicine 1368 (2002); “Patenting Human Organisms: An Ethical and Legal Analysis” (working draft of a paper prepared for the President’s Council on Bioethics); and “Bayh-Dole Reform and the Progress of Biomedicine,” 66 Law & Contemporary Problems 1 & 2 (2003) (with Rebecca S. Eisenberg), and Law and the Mental Health System, 3rd edition (West Group Publishing) (1999) (with Ralph Reisner and Chris Slobogin).

Prior to joining the Duke Law faculty in 2003, Professor Rai was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she was also a visiting professor in Fall 2000. From 1997-2001, she was a faculty member at the University of San Diego School of Law. She has also been a faculty fellow in the Program in Ethics and the Profession at Harvard University; a lecturer in law, University of Chicago Law School, Medical School, and Graduate School of Public Policy; a MacLean fellow at the University of Chicago Center for Clinical Medical Ethics; a trial attorney focused on health law at the United States Department of Justice, Civil Division, Federal Programs Branch. She was an associate at the firm of Jenner & Block, in Washington D.C., after completing a clerkship with Judge Marilyn Hall Patel on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco. Rai graduated from Harvard College, magna cum laude, with a B.A. in biochemistry and history, attended Harvard Medical School for the 1987-1988 academic year and received her J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 1991. While in law school, she served as executive editor for the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review.