Science Commons was re-integrated with Creative Commons. This content is no longer maintained and remains only for reference.

Who we work with

high journal cost

University librarians feel the trend toward increase scientific journal costs more acutely. Look up the average cost of journals over the past 20 years and you will see that the cost of journals has gone up 273% since 1986 (according the Association of Research Libraries). In comparison, the cost of living has gone up only 73% during the same time period.

At Science Commons, we believe that network technology can dramatically increase the pace of scientific progress. But the transition to “networked science” is not easy. To realize the same efficiency gains that the Web brought to commerce, we need to set in motion a fundamental transformation of the law, technology and culture that underpin the research process.

To this end, Science Commons reaches out to people and organizations from every part of the scientific ecosystem, identifying areas where we can work together to implement open, collaborative solutions for speeding the pace of discovery.

Science Commons was launched in 2005 with the generous support of the HighQ Foundation (now CHDI Foundation, Inc.) and Creative Commons. We receive additional funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, CHDI Foundation, Inc., Nike, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and other generous benefactors that wish to remain anonymous. Past funders include the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Omidyar Network and the Teranode Corporation. Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge LLP provides pro bono legal services. We have partnerships with the organizations listed here.

If you work in scientific research, we want to work with you. Please feel free to contact us for additional information.